Information Insecurity

Because a European court doesn’t trust U.S. protections on personal data, transatlantic commerce and national security are at risk

The Court of Justice in session: its <em>Schrems</em> decisions restricting the flow of personal data have been accused of hypocrisy. (European Court of Justice)
The Court of Justice in session: its Schrems decisions restricting the flow of personal data have been accused of hypocrisy. (European Court of Justice)
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Fred H. Cate and Rachel D. Dockery co-wrote this article. Fred H. Cate is Vice President for Research, Distinguished Professor, and C. Ben Dutton Professor of Law at Indiana University, and a senior policy adviser in the Centre for Information Policy Leadership. He is a former president of Phi Beta Kappa. Rachel D. Dockery is a senior research fellow in cybersecurity and privacy law at the Indiana University Maurer School of Law and Executive Director of the Indiana University Cybersecurity Clinic.

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